Air Purification

13Sep 2017

 

Joe Sr

The Joe W. Fly Company was founded in 1967 when Joe Fly Sr. (pictured above) started cutting air filters by hand in his living room. Legend has it that one day, Joe cut right through the room’s oriental rug, and his wife, Margaret, told him it was time to get a warehouse. 50 years later, we’re glad he listened.

Today, Joe’s son Joe Fly Jr., grandson Trey Fly, and our entire staff are proud to continue the Joe W. Fly legacy by providing outstanding service to customers and commitment to improving life’s most basic need – clean air.

50 Years of Growth and Service Across Texas

From that first warehouse in Dallas, Joe W. Fly Co. has grown to eight facilities throughout Texas. Our additional branches in Ft. Worth, Austin, Houston, San Antonio, Waco, College Station, and Harlingen have become vital parts of our operation, helping Joe W. Fly become the largest commercial and industrial HVAC filter distributor in Texas.

Having facilities throughout the state hasn’t only helped grow our business—it’s improved our ability to provide reliable service all of our customers. When we had to build a brand new facility in Dallas after the original warehouse suffered a late-night electrical fire, our other branches stepped up so that we didn’t miss a day of work.

Although we’ve grown to more than 120 employees, we’re still a family company. These values have shaped our company’s work atmosphere and continue to guide our approach to every customer engagement. When you partner with us, we treat you like part of the Joe W. Fly family.

joe fly co warehouse

Joe W. Fly Co’s Dallas Warehouse

Keeping Up With Changing Technology

The products, materials, and technology involved in air filtration and surface cleaning have come a long way since the ‘60s. As a company, we’ve not only adapted to grow in a changing industry, but also strived to bring useful new solutions to the marketplace for our customers. And we work with a wide range of manufacturers and suppliers to ensure that we can always recommend the best products for every customer.

Today we offer an increasingly wide range of cleaning, disinfection, and other environmental services. In addition to serving our core commercial and industrial customers, we’ve increasingly partnered with schools to support wellness in the learning environment, because air purification and surface disinfection are among the first lines of defense against the spread of illness.

That said, we’re still an air filter company at heart, and we keep working to make air filtration as effective as possible in the facilities we serve. Joe W. Fly was the first company to start providing synthetic air filters in Texas, and we started building custom metal filter frames about 30 years ago as a way to lower material costs for our customers. Over time, the ability to supply custom frames for every air handler in customers’ facilities became a major distinction for Joe W. Fly compared to other air filter suppliers.

In addition to saving on materials, our custom frame and media systems help customers eliminate air bypass, resulting in more effective filtration and more efficient energy use. This is an important area for finding savings because of the shift from constant volume drives to variable frequency drives in air handlers. The pressure drop caused by air filters in your HVAC system is a key factor in determining how much energy fans need to use to achieve the necessary air flow.

Harvey

Looking to the Future – Together

We’re proud of the work we’ve done helping organizations improve their indoor air quality over the last 50 years. And we’re excited for the innovations in air purification, surface disinfection, and environmental services that will happen in the next 50 years.

We hope you’ll contact us to learn more about how our industry knowledge, family values, and commitment to customer service can benefit you.

 

31Jul 2017

 

healthy schools for healthy future

The quality of indoor air and cleanliness of frequently touched surfaces are critical issues for all educational facilities, from the smallest K-12 schools to the largest universities. Unsanitary conditions can lead to the spread of germs and illness among students and teachers. This has multiple negative effects on a school and can even cause costly major outbreaks.

Schools have a difficult mission dedicating the necessary resources to maintenance and janitorial functions at a time when public budgets are tight and competition is increasing in the academic world. However, investing in cleaner facilities can create substantial value for schools—without requiring a large increase in operational costs.

How Illness and Absenteeism Cost Texas Schools Millions

Funding for all public schools is affected by student attendance, although several different methods are used to determine the impact. Texas and many other states use average daily attendance as a factor in determining funding for local school districts. Under this formula, each student absence results in the loss of a certain amount of state funding.

Although health is only one of many reasons that students miss school, illness is a major contributor to absenteeism. Germs can spread rapidly in schools when the proper cleaning and disinfection practices are not followed. The cost of lost funding can add up just as rapidly.

Schools in the Central Texas region lose almost $100 million annually due to student absenteeism, according to an analysis of local data by the E3 Alliance. The group examined 35 school districts and 15 charter schools in Central Texas and found that the region’s 307,000 students accrued 2.4 million absences during a single school year—causing more than $91 million in lost funding at an average cost of $38 per student absence.

The Austin Independent School District, which lost $45 for each absence in the E3 analysis, saved about $2 million by increasing student attendance less than 1%. If the district achieved perfect attendance, its annual funding would increase by at least $50 million.

In the event of a major school-based disease outbreak, schools can incur significant additional costs for clean-up. A recent outbreak of norovirus caused hundreds of student absences at a single Texas elementary school, and at least nine schools in the state were closed for cleaning due to influenza outbreaks earlier in the year.

Closing schools for disinfection after an outbreak is far more disruptive and expensive than taking preventive measures to reduce the risk. For example, a 2015 norovirus outbreak that affected nearly 2,000 students and staff at 19 schools in Washoe County, Nevada resulted in approximately $180,000 in excess cleaning costs.

Cleaner Facilities Help Prevent the Spread of Illness

“Cleaning” doesn’t necessarily always mean the same thing as “disinfecting” or “sanitizing”—and the difference is significant when you’re talking about a classroom or cafeteria that is used hundreds or thousands of students every day. What we all think of as conventional cleaning methods—mopping the floors, washing surfaces with soap and water—are important, but they’re also very labor intensive and can leave germs behind.

Schools can take additional steps to prevent illness, such as implementing a surface disinfection system, without significantly increasing their operating costs. Without the right technology, most districts simply don’t have sufficient janitorial resources to disinfect all of the surfaces in their schools on a regular basis.

There also other smart preventive measures administrators can use to reduce the cost of keeping facilities cleaner. For example, proper air filtration is essential to preventing contaminants from spreading in schools.

The ​EPA offers tips, resources, and other “Tools for Schools” to improve indoor air quality. The agency recommends using filters with a MERV rating in the 8-13 range. The Texas Department of State Health Services recommends MERV 9 or higher as part of its Building Operation and Maintenance Guidelines (§297.5. of the Voluntary Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for Government Buildings).

The National Air Filtration Association recommends that schools aim higher and use filters rated at least MERV 13—both to protect student health and to prevent costly HVAC maintenance issues. It’s also important to note that a filter’s MERV rating is only one factor that affects its efficiency. Filters are only fully effective when they are the right quantity and size, and when they are properly installed and sealed to prevent air bypass.

learn more 2

Joe W. Fly Co. uses a two-pronged approach to supporting healthy schools: improving indoor air quality with filtration systems and providing electrostatic surface disinfection targeting critical “touch points” such as desks, doors, and tables.

The experts at Joe W. Fly Co. frequently recommend improvements that increase filtration efficiency while saving labor and material costs. Our frame and media system is highly efficient for schools’ maintenance or janitorial teams, and helps guard against dangerous mold growth. Mold thrives in dark, damp conditions whenever it has a food source—which makes disposable filters with cardboard frames highly vulnerable.

Our galvanized steel frames and completely synthetic filters are hydrophobic and antimicrobial—making it extremely difficult for mold to grow. We also offer just-in-time delivery of pre-cut filter media to minimize the amount of labor related to changing out air filters in schools.

Learn how Joe W. Fly Co. can help keep air and surfaces clean in your school.

30May 2017

It’s often difficult for building engineers to identify signs of energy waste within their HVAC system. A lack of time or expertise can prevent them from properly examining their units and finding opportunities to save. This article and video explain how engineers can tell if they are using the wrong size air filter or have the filter improperly installed—and how these factors can cause energy costs to soar. We’ll also discuss common workarounds and the value of having input from air filtration experts.

Joe W. Fly Co. CEO Joe Fly Jr. explains some of the warning signs that can indicate energy is being wasted in your HVAC system.

Common Issues With Filter Sizing, Installation, and Maintenance

The most common issue that causes energy waste is when filters are either the wrong size or not installed tightly. In either case, the issue will lead to air bypass in your HVAC system. Over time, unfiltered air in the system causes evaporator coils to become dirty—which reduces filter efficiency, leaves equipment unprotected, increase the risk of breakdown, and can lead to costly repairs. Other common problems include facilities using the wrong type of filters, not replacing filters that have gotten wet, moldy, or blown through, misplacing clips that hold filters in place, or not repairing broken access doors.

Air filtration

 

Recommendations: Identifying and Fixing Air Filter Issues

If you want to get a better idea of what issues are affecting your HVAC system, the first things you should examine are the sizing and installation of your air filters. Specifically:

  1. Make sure there are no gaps allowing air bypass between filters or at the end of filter tracks
  2. Check for “bowing” or other signs that filters are becoming worn out and need to be changed
  3. Dirty evaporator coils are a sure sign that some part of the filter system is not installed correctly

Air bypass between and around the filters.  Bypass could be with the actual filters or with the holding frames/track that the filters go in.  If there is a lot of dirt buildup in certain areas of the evaporator coil, that is usually a pretty good sign there is some bypass present

To ensure each filter is installed properly, you should make sure there is proper gasket with a positive seal and no bypass, and that clips are applied where needed to hold filters steady.  If you or your staff are unsure of how to do this, having a NAFA Certified Technician take a look can help.

Once you’ve identified any issues in your system, it’s time to fix the problems. This could involve:

  1. Getting the correct number and size of filters
  2. Installing a custom filter if needed to fill the track tightly and completely
  3. Adding gaskets or clips to frames or filters where needed to prevent air bypass

How Much Can You Save?

The impact of air filtration issues on energy use is directly related to the heat transfer efficiency of the unit. If the equipment is dirty, partially blocked off from air flow, otherwise obstructed, then the compressor will have to work harder to keep the air properly conditioned—resulting in unnecessary energy use that adds to your facility’s operating costs. When you consider a large building with many units, the cost can be significant. Protecting evaporator coils with proper filtration will also decrease or eliminate the need to clean those coils, which is a significant labor savings year after year.

Ready to learn more about managing your HVAC costs? Contact the filtration experts at Joe W. Fly Co. today.